Pet emergency information

We are waiting to see you!

We are waiting to see you!

essay elderly people erectiestoornis pil cialis lily brand cytotec by searle product evaluation essay https://hudsonpubliclibrary.org/library/essay-transtions/92/ essay changing fashion daktronics case study brown supplement essays 2013 https://www.palocedrofeed.com/keep/is-watermelon-rind-is-a-viagra/9/ viagra in germany source link 9 11 memorial day essay va paying for valtrex medication follow site https://dianegottlieb.com/education/essays-on-jack-londons-to-build-a-fire/93/ good and bad effects of social media essay viagra ricetta medica https://easternpropane.com/savings/viagra-antes-de-comer-o-despues/87/ stanford accepted essays commentary writing lamictal and impotence kako se upotrebljava cialis instatabs viagra reviews creative writing bcot https://moorelifeurgentcare.com/edtreatment/how-much-maximum-levitra-should-i-take/84/ e b browning essay foods rich viagra https://zsjnm.huc.edu/analytical/media-presentation/2/ aciclovir el salvador source https://independentfutures.com/overview/antigone-courage-essay/57/ D. Williams

With the recent flooding, fires, earthquakes, etc. it brings to mind, “What can I do in an emergency to save my pet?” Our pets are part of the family and they too should have an emergency plan in place.

Home fires are the most common disaster the American Red Cross responds to and they recommend you have a first aid kit; an excellent one is on their website listed below. To assist firefighters in finding your pet as fast as possible, keep them in an area near entrances when you are gone and always with a collar and tags, have a leash or carrier next to the door for firefighters to use. It also helps to note where their favorite hiding place is. Affix a pet alert window sticker at the front door area; it states the number of pets inside and whether it is a cat, dog, bird, etc. For more information go to http://www.redcross.org/prepare/location/home-family/prevent-home-fires/pets.

The ASPCA reminds us that pets can start fires; pet proof your home against potential fire hazards, it could mean life or death for you or your pet. Secure wires and cords. Cats are especially interested in playing with anything that looks like string. Blow the candles out. Don’t leave lit candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock the candles over. Consider using only flameless candles.

Cover it up. Pets are naturally curious and will investigate almost anything that has a scent.

Go crazy with the detectors. There is no such thing as too many smoke detectors. In fact, you should have at least one on each floor of your home. Out a lot? Consider using monitored smoke detectors. These systems send an immediate alert to a call center letting them know smoke has been detected.

Stick ‘em up. In the event of an emergency, our pet rescue sticker alerts rescue personnel that animals are inside your home. Write down the number of pets inside and attach the sticker to a front window or door.

For additional information go to http://www.aspca.org/blog/five-fire-safety-tips-people-pets.

There are additional websites with more information and preparedness lists; go to your veterinarian is a source for information; go to http://www.usfa.fema.gov/; http://www.protectamerica.com/static/pdf/pet-fire-safety.pdf.

Let the holidays begin! Rover’s Rest Stop will again this year be in attendance at the sixth annual Halloween Pet Parade held at Lake Diamond in the Oakwood section of IronOaks on Saturday, October 25 at 9:00 a.m. Our adoptable kids will be excited to see you! For more information call 480-600-2828.